Monthly archives of “March 2012

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Dietary Salt – What is Salt? How Much is Too much?

Common table salt is a mineral made up primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl).The sodium (Na) component of salt is essential to human life, as it is required for important functions such as muscle contraction, including heartbeat, and nerve conduction. Too much sodium in the body, however, has been linked to health risks, such as high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. Each gram (1000 mg) of table salt contains approximately 400 mg of sodium. As a reference, one teaspoon of salt is equal to approximately 6 grams of sodium chloride or 2,360 mg of sodium.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has taken the position that 90% of adults in the U.S. consume more sodium than is recommended. Read More

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Diabetes Alert Day – Take the Diabetes Risk Test Today!

In 2011, the American Diabetes Association encouraged Americans to “Join the Million Challenge” and more than 600,000 people took the Diabetes Risk Test. On March, 27, 2012, the Association will aim to top that number, inspiring people to take the all-new Diabetes Risk Test, as well as to share the test with everyone they care about – friends, family members and colleagues. With each person that takes the test and knows their risk, the Association is that much closer to stopping diabetes.

American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, which is held every fourth Tuesday in March, is a one-day, “wake-up call” asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

The new Diabetes Risk Test asks users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risks for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.  Preventative tips are provided for everyone who takes the test, including encouraging those at high risk to talk with their health care provider.

Diabetes by the Numbers

Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States, and a quarter of them—7 million—do not even know they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take the steps to Stop Diabetes®.

Are You at Risk? Read More

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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal cancer is the second most deadly cancer for both men and women. Yet according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most of these deaths could be prevented if everyone over the age of 50 got screened for colorectal cancer. The best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to get screened. There are often no signs or symptoms of colorectal cancer. If left undiagnosed or undetected, colorectal cancer can spread throughout the body.To increase awareness of colorectal cancer screenings, ODS is proudly participating in Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. The Department of Health and Human Services states that colorectal cancer screening tests can detect cancer early, when treatment is very successful.
People over age 50 are at highest risk for colorectal cancer. Other risk factors include Read More
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Nutrition Tips – March is National Nutrition Month!

ODS is proud to join the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) during March in celebrating National Nutrition Month. This year’s National Nutrition Month theme is “Get Your Plate in Shape” and encourages consumers to remember to include a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins and dairy on their plates every day.

Here are a few ways to “Get Your Plate in Shape” from the food and nutrition experts at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:

  • Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables: Eat a variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red and orange varieties. Add fresh, dried, frozen or canned fruits to meals and snacks.
  • Make at least half your grains whole: Choose 100 percent whole-grain breads, cereals, crackers, pasta and brown rice. Check the ingredients list on food packages to find whole-grain foods.
  • Switch to fat-free or low-fat milk: Fat-free and low-fat milk have the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but less fat and calories. For those who are lactose intolerant, try lactose-free milk or a calcium-fortified soy beverage.
  • Vary your protein choices: Eat a variety of foods from the protein food group each week, such as seafood, nuts and beans, as well as lean meat, poultry and eggs. Keep meat and poultry portions small and lean. And be sure to choose seafood as the protein at least twice a week.
  • Cut back on sodium and empty calories from solid fats and added sugars: Compare sodium in foods and choose those with lower numbers, and season your foods with herbs and spices instead of salt. Switch from solid fats to healthy oils like olive and canola oil. Replace sugary drinks with water and choose fruit for dessert.
  • Enjoy your foods but eat less: Avoid oversized portions. Use a smaller plate, bowl and glass. Cook more often at home where you are in control of what’s in your food. When eating out, choose lower calorie menu options.
  • Be physically active your way: Adults need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of physical activity every week. Choose activities that you enjoy, and start by doing as much as you can.

As part of this public education campaign, the Academy’s National Nutrition Month website includes a variety of helpful tips, fun games, promotional tools and nutrition education resources, all designed to spread the message of good nutrition around the “Get Your Plate in Shape” theme.  Check them out and let us know how you are celebrating National Nutrition Month!